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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
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urban agriculture policy

Local Government Support Bolsters Urban Farming Movement in Salt Lake County, UT

November 2, 2016 |
Photo courtesy of Supreet Gill.

Preserving existing agricultural resources is a key priority for Salt Lake County Urban Farming. The County has three large parcels of land, one of which it leases to Petersen Family Farms (pictured). Photo courtesy of Supreet Gill.

The story in Salt Lake County, Utah is pretty typical of a post 2008 American community. Vacant lots, underutilized land and an ever-growing local populace who would rather have locally grown produce than chemically-saturated, origin-iffy imports. The difference in Salt Lake County, however, is that rather than a nonprofit or private company, the government is facilitating the local food and urban farming movement.

“The urban farming program is the brainchild of Councilman Jim Bradley,” says Supreet Gill, Program Manager for Salt Lake County Urban Farming. “He initially became interested in the program after reading an article by Michael Pollan on [the] benefits of eating healthy food. Since that time, the urban farming program staff has created and managed various projects aimed at promoting cultivation and consumption of local, fresh and healthy food.”

Salt Lake County Urban Farming is a mediator, a go between if you will, that facilitates the relationship between the producer and the consumer with nothing to gain monetarily (budgets are beyond tight). Read More

Only 10 Days Left to Register for ‘Grow Local OC: Future of Urban Food Systems Conference’

October 27, 2016 |

grow-local-oc-future-of-urban-food-systemsThe Grow Local OC: Future of Urban Food Systems Conference presented by Seedstock in partnership with the OC Food Access Coalition is only 10 DAYS away. Slated for Nov. 10 – 11, 2016, at California State University, Fullerton (Hosted by U-ACRE), the conference will explore the community and economic development potential of fostering local food systems in cities.

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Only Three Weeks to Go Until ‘Grow Local OC: Future of Urban Food Systems Conference’

October 20, 2016 |

grow local oc conference future of urban food systems orange countyThe Grow Local OC: Future of Urban Food Systems Conference presented by Seedstock in partnership with the OC Food Access Coalition is only THREE WEEKS away. Slated for Nov. 10 – 11, 2016, at California State University, Fullerton (Hosted by U-ACRE), the conference will explore the community and economic development potential of fostering local food systems in cities.

Below is a summary of the conference details:

Day 1 – Conference Day 

Day 1 (Nov. 10) of the conference, attendees will convene at the Portola Pavilion at California State University, Fullerton in Orange County, CA for a series of panels and keynotes that will address such topic areas as: Read More

A Big City Chef Returns Home to Plant Urban Farming Roots

October 20, 2016 |
Nolan Schmidt, of Tower Urban Family Farm, left life as a big city chef to return home to Fresno to start an urban farm. Photo courtesy of Tower Urban Family Farm.

Nolan Schmidt, of Tower Urban Family Farm, left life as a big city chef to return home to Fresno to start an urban farm. Photo courtesy of Tower Urban Family Farm.

Nolan Schmidt of Tower Urban Family Farm (TUFF) in Fresno, recalls a particularly eye-opening incident at one of his urban garden sites, when a group of children from a local school stopped by to sample some of their produce. “One of the kids tried a kiwi and you just saw his eyes light up like he had just discovered something he never knew was possible.” Nolan learned that none of these children had ever seen a kiwi. The irony was not lost on him. Not far from where these children lived, kiwis are farmed commercially on a large scale. “So maybe two miles from their home is a kiwi farm, but yet they’ve never seen a kiwi.” And just like much of the produce grown in this fertile area, it ends up being shipped elsewhere, served up in big city restaurants and markets around the world, while neighborhoods of Fresno are plagued with food deserts.

It was an unusual path that led Nolan to urban farming, for he is actually a chef by trade. At 17 he pursued the culinary arts, working in many restaurants in Fresno, until he realized that to progress he would have to move to a big city. He ended up working at a three star restaurant in New York. “It’s kind of funny that I had to cook in New York to realize I wanted to be a farmer in Fresno,” he says. It was there that he realized that Fresno and the Central Valley grow some of the best produce in the world, “And it’s then shipped around the world for all these chefs to define themselves.” Read More

Despite Loss of Land, Atlanta Urban Farm Incorporates Learnings and Fights to Grow Another Day

October 3, 2016 |
(left to right) Cecilia Gatungo and Jamila Norman, the founders and farmers behind Patchwork City Farms in Atlanta. Photo courtesy of Patchwork City Farms.

(left to right) Cecilia Gatungo and Jamila Norman, the founders and farmers behind Patchwork City Farms in Atlanta. Photo courtesy of Patchwork City Farms.

Urban farming plays a vital role in community development—it provides access to healthy, local food and creates a bond between the farmer and local residents.

Yet sometimes, that bond can be taken away.

That’s what happened to Patchwork City Farms in Atlanta when the farm, which was situated on land belonging to the Atlanta school district, lost its lease, says Jamila Norman, an environmental engineer turned farmer, who started the urban agriculture venture with her business partner Cecilia Gatungo.

Their interest in farming began in 2010, when they helped a local church that was growing food onsite to distribute produce to local markets. Norman and her partner Gatungo had no background in farming, except that they had grandparents and great grandparents who were farmers. Read More