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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
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Tufts University Online Graduate Certificate Program in Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems

June 23, 2017 |

Sponsored Story: The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is currently accepting applications to the Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems online graduate certificate program.

The online program is ideal for professionals engaged in a variety of food-related businesses and organizations, as well as others who would like to learn more about implementing sustainable practices for their organizations, partners, and communities. Read More

Sensing Opportunity in Drought, Two Horticulture Classmates Launch Eco Conscious Aquaponics Farm

June 21, 2017 |

The Eco Conscious Aquaponics team in their greenhouse in Goleta, CA. Owners Julian Cantando and Clayton Garland (pictured center left and center right) decided to launch the farm at the height of the California drought. Photo credit: Pamela Ellgen.

In 2016, at the height of the California drought, Julian Cantando and Clayton Garland envisioned a more sustainable farming model than traditional soil-based agriculture, which has always thrived in California.

“Last year was the seventh year of the drought, the lake was down, and the threat of not having water was real, at least for other farmers who aren’t on a well. It was kind of a bleak situation,” Cantando says.

He and Garland were classmates in the Horticulture Program at Santa Barbara City College and often discussed going into business together. Read More

How a New Way of Thinking About Soil Sparked a National Movement in Agriculture

June 20, 2017 |

This article was originally published on Ensia.com

As word gets around that soil is alive, farmers have adopted a whole new attitude toward their land.

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For three weeks every month, Ray Archuleta captivates audiences with a few handfuls of soil. He begins with two clumps, dropping them into water. The soil from a farm where the soil isn’t tilled holds together, while the tilled soil immediately disperses, indicating poor soil structure. Next, volunteers from the audience — mostly farmers and ranchers — pour water over a soil that grew a variety of crops, and it runs right through. A sample of tilled soil that grew only corn is like a brick, and the water sits on top. Water is the most precious resource for growing crops, and having a soil that is unable to absorb water is crippling for farmers. Read More

USDA Announces Grants Designed to Increase Amount of Local Food Served in Schools

June 13, 2017 |

News Release: WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Agriculture today announced the projects selected to receive the USDA’s annual farm to school grants designed to increase the amount of local foods served in schools. Sixty-five projects were chosen nationwide.

“Increasing the amount of local foods in America’s schools is a win-win for everyone,” said Cindy Long, Deputy Administrator for Child Nutrition Programs at USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service, which administers the Department’s school meals programs. “Farm to school projects foster healthy eating habits among America’s school-age children, and local economies are nourished, as well, when schools buy the food they provide from local producers.” Read More