Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture

Scroll to top

Top

Urban Agriculture

City of Atlanta to Host Inaugural ‘Aglanta Conference: Where Growing Opportunity Meets Thriving Community’

December 9, 2016 |

aglanta-conference-atlanta-controlled-environment-agricultureATLANTA – The Aglanta Conference is a gathering to showcase urban and controlled environment agriculture (CEA) innovation in the City of Atlanta. The City of Atlanta has partnered with Blue Planet Consulting to bring together restaurateurs, grocers, architects, entrepreneurs, technologists, business owners, and urban farmers for this premium networking and knowledge sharing opportunity. Our goal is to foster Atlanta’s growth as a central hub in the nation’s $9 billion a year indoor farming industry.

The Aglanta Conference will be an intimate and invaluable environment for participants to engage with a local, national, and international audience. Through workshops, lectures, and networking sessions, the conference will cover issues across the spectrum of urban agriculture business models and technologies, with a particular focus on the emerging field of vertical/indoor farming. We will spotlight local champions already doing incredible work growing food as means of ecological restoration, social cohesion, cultural preservation, economic development, and biopharmaceutical development. Read More

Weekly Stories of Food Systems Innovation from Around the Country

December 8, 2016 |

Arizona Urban Farming Startup Embraces Aquaponics to Increase Access to Healthy Food

BY VANESSA CACERES

Merchant’s Garden operates a 10,000-square-foot greenhouse; that utilizes an aquaponics system to grow lettuce, various other leafy greens, basils, … Read More

‘Insurgent Architecture’ Students Built a Mobile Greenhouse to Overcome Urban Farming Challenges

December 7, 2016 |

It is believed to be a world first: a fully functioning greenhouse on wheels that plugs in much like an RV and that could offer up solutions to some of urban farming’s biggest challenges. The mobile greenhouse prototype, which goes by the name GrOwING GREEN, was born of a collaboration between architecture students at Ball State University and Butler University’s Center for Urban Ecology (CUE). It has already been recognized by the American Institute of Architects with a state award for excellence in architecture.

Timothy Gray, a professor of Architecture at Ball State, whose fourth year students designed and constructed the mobile greenhouse, points out that the mobility aspect opens up a world of possibilities, including the idea of bringing the farm to the people. As stated on their website, the prototype, “lends itself to the shifting and temporal nature of the urban farm.” Read More

Arizona Urban Farming Startup Embraces Aquaponics to Increase Access to Healthy Food

December 6, 2016 |
(From left to right) Chaz Shelton and Bill Shriver, co-founders of Tucson, AZ-based Merchant's Garden, an urban farming enterprise utilizing hydroponics and aquaponics to increase access to healthy food in cities. Photo Courtesy of Merchant's Garden.

(From left to right) Chaz Shelton and Bill Shriver, co-founders of Tucson, AZ-based Merchant’s Garden, an urban farming enterprise utilizing hydroponics and aquaponics to increase access to healthy food in cities. Photo Courtesy of Merchant’s Garden.

Farmers need to be good at a little bit of everything—from growing and marketing to strategic planning. Chaz Shelton of Merchant’s Garden in Tucson, Arizona, approaches farming from a slightly different angle. He earned his MBA at Indiana University-Bloomington and is using that broad business knowledge to manage his hydroponic and aquaponics operation with co-founder Bill Shriver.

Shelton’s interest in farming began more out of an interest in public health. While working with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health in Pennsylvania several years ago, he often saw how poor eating led to adverse health outcomes. He solidified his idea that instead of shipping food from faraway farms into urban environments, he could bring farming into the city.

That led two years ago to the formation of Merchant’s Garden, an urban farming enterprise whose mission, according to the company website, is to “make fresh food accessible and affordable to everyone using the science of aquaponics and hydroponics.” The farm was started with the help of investors and the business accelerator organization Startup Tucson. It launched just as Shelton was finishing up his MBA. Read More

Master Gardener Program Grows Food and Community Across L.A. County

November 29, 2016 |

Since University of California Cooperative Extension established the first Master Gardener Programs in the state in 1981, its army of certified volunteer gardeners, who are today spread across more than 50 counties, have supported programs aimed at educating California residents, especially those living in low-income communities, about growing their own food.

In Los Angeles, one such program that Master Gardener Program volunteers supported was the Common Ground Garden Program, which was established in 1976 with funds from a Congressional appropriations bill to support a national Urban Garden Program. Working in collaboration with the Common Ground Garden Program, the Master Gardener volunteers played a pivotal role in helping to set up several community and school gardens across the county.

After funding from the Urban Garden Program ceased, the Los Angeles County branch of the Master Gardener Program formally took over the task of training community gardeners.  Read More

In Collaboration with Underserved Community an Outsider Helps Establish First Urban Farm in Dallas

November 28, 2016 |

In what some might describe as a midlife crisis and others an epiphany, Daron Babcock, the executive Director of urban farming organization Bonton Farms, quit his all-consuming job in the corporate world and moved to Bonton, an impoverished inner city community in Dallas, Texas. He had already been volunteering there once a week, meeting with a group of men who had been in prison and were struggling to get their lives back on track. But two hours on a Saturday was not enough, so he decided to work full-time with the men.

After moving to Bonton, he noticed that many people were sick and dying at a rapid rate. He also learned that Bonton was a food desert, with the nearest grocery store a three hour return trip on public transportation. Daron recognized a correlation between the lack of access to healthy food and the high rate of cancer, stroke, heart disease, and diabetes – Bonton had a 300 percent higher death rate from diabetes than the county rate.

It was a collaboration between six men, three of whom suffered from diabetes and cancer, that led to a decision to plant a garden. Read More

Father-Son Team Launch First Urban Farm in South Carolina to Meet Growing Demand for Local Food

November 22, 2016 |
(From left to right) Father and son team, Robbie and Eric McClam, run City Roots, the first urban farm in South Carolina. Photo credit: City Roots.

(From left to right) Father and son team, Robbie and Eric McClam, run City Roots, the first urban farm in South Carolina. Photo credit: City Roots.

After 30 years working in the field of architecture, Robbie McClam yearned to return to his farming roots. His first ever job was working in the tobacco fields of the farm on which his father was raised. He remembers it as the hardest job he ever had, according to son Eric.

In 2008, Robbie learned of the work being done by renowned urban farmer Will Allen and his Growing Power organization in Milwaukee and upon retiring from his career in architecture, decided to enroll in its 5 month Commercial Urban Agriculture Program.
Read More

Urban Agriculture Incentive Program Seeks to Increase Farming Opportunities in Local Communities

November 21, 2016 |

In September 2013, California passed Assembly Bill 551 (AB551), Urban Agriculture Incentive Zones (UAIZ), which allows cities and counties within the state to incentivize land owners to donate vacant or undeveloped land for urban agriculture use over a five-year period, according to information from the Los Angeles Department of Regional Planning. Land owners who participate will receive reduced property tax assessments in exchange for this allowance.

The requirements to participate include parcels between 0.10 and 3 acres, a minimum contract of five years, complete use of the land for agriculture purposes, and no prior physical structures existing on the property. Many California communities have already passed or are in the process of approving the ordinance including San Francisco, San Diego, Long Beach, San Jose, and Sacramento; however, only a couple of contracts have been processed in those areas combined.

The ordinance has already passed through Los Angeles County, but this motion only applies to unincorporated areas. The incorporated city of Los Angeles is currently in the process of approving the ordinance, according to Iesha Siler, a policy associate for the Los Angeles Food Policy Council (LAFPC). Read More