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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
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new farmers

Community College in Southwest Embraces Aquaponics to Grow Farmers of the Future

July 26, 2016 |
Urban Agriculture Students at Santa Fe Community College learn about hydroponics and aquaponics. A new aquaponics facility is on the horizon for the college.(photo courtesy Adam Cohen/Santa Fe Community College)

Urban Agriculture Students at Santa Fe Community College learn about hydroponics and aquaponics. A new aquaponics facility is on the horizon for the college.(photo courtesy Adam Cohen/Santa Fe Community College)

With the embrace of aquaponics growing in tow with the urban agriculture sector, Santa Fe Community College in New Mexico wants to stay ahead of the curve and insure that its students are positioned to become the farmers of the future.

“The aquaponics industry is growing—10 years ago no one had heard of aquaponics and hydroponics—now people are excited,” says Adam Cohen, lead faculty member for the college’s greenhouse management program. “In the next five years, where do we go? We want to get information out to people and provide students with a way to go out and find jobs.”

Cohen says that aquaponics is a great agricultural technology to employ and teach in New Mexico as the state has a very arid climate and trenchant water resource challenges. Read More

Women in Food: Tessa Edick and FarmOn! Corral Capital For Hudson Valley Ag Programs

July 12, 2016 |
Tessa Edick posing with a copy of her book on the Hudson Valley food system. Edick is the Executive Director of the FarmOn! Foundation, which raises capital to support a variety of food system-building projects in New York's Hudson Valley. Photo courtesy of FarmOn! Foundation.

Tessa Edick posing with a copy of her book on the Hudson Valley food system. Edick is the Executive Director of the FarmOn! Foundation, which raises capital to support a variety of food system-building projects in New York’s Hudson Valley. Photo courtesy of FarmOn! Foundation.

When Tessa Edick was a young girl, she spent visits to her grandmother’s dairy farm in upstate New York pining over a big city life in which she would have her own elegant law office and manicured, dirt-free fingernails.

“Honestly, we were broke, and it was just smelly and embarrassing,” she says. “I wanted glamor and success. But a funny thing called life happened.”

As she grew into an ambitious communications professional, Edick found an unlikely synergy between her early farm experiences and her love of boutique culture. Beginning with her own label of specialty jarred sauces–Sauces N’ Love—that ended up selling in 4,000 stores nationally within its first five years, Edick continued to carve out a niche for herself as a food product development pro. She created lines for Tom Colicchio, Todd English, and several major retail companies, and in 2010 established her own consulting and development company called Culinary Partnership that offers everything from co-packing to TV production services. Read More

Pennsylvania Farming Startup Grows Business by Trial and Error

February 28, 2014 |
Landon Jefferies catches a break in the shade at Root Mass Farm. Photo credit: Albert Yee

Landon catches a break in the shade. Photo credit: Albert Yee

Landon Jefferies knew he wanted to pursue farming as a career, but the options in the city were limited.

So after spending a year working farmers’ markets for The Food Trust, a Philadelphia organization that works to ensure access to affordable, nutritious food and information, and three seasons as the manager of Wyck Home Farm, a Philadelphia historic home, garden and farm, he and partner Lindsey Shapiro set about launching Root Mass Farm in rural Berks County, Pennsylvania in the summer of 2011.

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Colorado Greenhouse Startup Perseveres Despite Challenging Weather Events

February 24, 2014 |
Damage to the farm’s perennial crops by the Boulder County Flood won’t be known until spring. Photo Credit: Hannah DeHerrera

Damage to the farm’s perennial crops by the Boulder County Flood won’t be known until spring.
Photo Credit: Hannah DeHerrera

The DeHerrera family has worked the land of Longmont, Colorado for six generations. Utilizing just three acres of that farmland, niece Hannah DeHerrera and her husband Simon began Flipside Farm In 2013, growing fresh winter produce for area families.

So far this startup has met with numerous weather related challenges. By adapting their business model and making use of urban space, Flipside Farm just completed its second harvest, demonstrating that fresh vegetable production doesn’t have to stop because of snow and flood.

Determining what crops to offer has been a combination of experimentation with growing conditions and understanding the local market. A call to the farmer’s market informed DeHerrera that many of the traditional crops were already saturating the local market. Read More

Georgia Organic Micro Farmer Squeezes Plenty from Small, Urban Lot

February 6, 2014 |
The Armenian Tigger Melon is a favorite of Frazer Love, who grows several unique varieties of melon on his urban micro farm, Perpetual Harvest. Photo Credits: Frazer Love

The Armenian Tigger Melon is a favorite of Frazer Love, who grows several unique varieties of melon on his urban micro farm, Perpetual Harvest.
Photo Credits: Frazer Love

Getting through the first season as a new farmer can be daunting, but Perpetual Harvest owner Frazer Love faced the challenge with a commitment to organic growing.

As Love explains: “When we contribute positively to our community, our community sustains us as a naturally created cycle.”

Love took a chance when he left his job in October 2012 to become a micro farmer. A micro farm, according to Love, is an urban plot of land no bigger than 4 acres dedicated to producing fruits, vegetables, and, at times, poultry.

To start his farm, Love built twelve 16-square-foot raised beds on his home property in Athens, GA, and installed a custom irrigation system featuring a feeding barrel for compost tea and ball valves on each bed to control water flow.

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