Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture

Scroll to top

Top

new farmers

Pennsylvania Farming Startup Grows Business by Trial and Error

February 28, 2014 |
Landon Jefferies catches a break in the shade at Root Mass Farm. Photo credit: Albert Yee

Landon catches a break in the shade. Photo credit: Albert Yee

Landon Jefferies knew he wanted to pursue farming as a career, but the options in the city were limited.

So after spending a year working farmers’ markets for The Food Trust, a Philadelphia organization that works to ensure access to affordable, nutritious food and information, and three seasons as the manager of Wyck Home Farm, a Philadelphia historic home, garden and farm, he and partner Lindsey Shapiro set about launching Root Mass Farm in rural Berks County, Pennsylvania in the summer of 2011.

Read More

Colorado Greenhouse Startup Perseveres Despite Challenging Weather Events

February 24, 2014 |
Damage to the farm’s perennial crops by the Boulder County Flood won’t be known until spring. Photo Credit: Hannah DeHerrera

Damage to the farm’s perennial crops by the Boulder County Flood won’t be known until spring.
Photo Credit: Hannah DeHerrera

The DeHerrera family has worked the land of Longmont, Colorado for six generations. Utilizing just three acres of that farmland, niece Hannah DeHerrera and her husband Simon began Flipside Farm In 2013, growing fresh winter produce for area families.

So far this startup has met with numerous weather related challenges. By adapting their business model and making use of urban space, Flipside Farm just completed its second harvest, demonstrating that fresh vegetable production doesn’t have to stop because of snow and flood.

Determining what crops to offer has been a combination of experimentation with growing conditions and understanding the local market. A call to the farmer’s market informed DeHerrera that many of the traditional crops were already saturating the local market. Read More

Georgia Organic Micro Farmer Squeezes Plenty from Small, Urban Lot

February 6, 2014 |
The Armenian Tigger Melon is a favorite of Frazer Love, who grows several unique varieties of melon on his urban micro farm, Perpetual Harvest. Photo Credits: Frazer Love

The Armenian Tigger Melon is a favorite of Frazer Love, who grows several unique varieties of melon on his urban micro farm, Perpetual Harvest.
Photo Credits: Frazer Love

Getting through the first season as a new farmer can be daunting, but Perpetual Harvest owner Frazer Love faced the challenge with a commitment to organic growing.

As Love explains: “When we contribute positively to our community, our community sustains us as a naturally created cycle.”

Love took a chance when he left his job in October 2012 to become a micro farmer. A micro farm, according to Love, is an urban plot of land no bigger than 4 acres dedicated to producing fruits, vegetables, and, at times, poultry.

To start his farm, Love built twelve 16-square-foot raised beds on his home property in Athens, GA, and installed a custom irrigation system featuring a feeding barrel for compost tea and ball valves on each bed to control water flow.

Read More

New Maryland Farmer Re-starts Successful Family Microgreen Business

January 29, 2014 |
Coole Beans Farms' carrots and beats. Photo courtesy of Dixie Blades

Cool Beans Farms’ carrots and beets. Photo courtesy of Dixie Blades

This is the story of start-up farm that is actually a start-over.

For most of his life, David Lankford, along with his wife Sharon, ran a farm on Maryland’s Eastern Shore called Davon Crest II, which was particularly well known in the Washington D.C. and Baltimore areas for quality microgreens grown year-round in heated greenhouses.

When David decided to get out of the day-to-day farming business to work for a company that produces farming software, he offered the farm to his sister, Dixie Blades.

Read More

South Carolina First-generation Hydroponics Farmer Learns By Doing

January 27, 2014 |
Tyger River sells at local farmers' market. Photo by Ryan Oates

Tyger River sells at local farmers’ market.
Photo by Ryan Oates

Sometimes what appears to be a detour ends up being the right road all along.

Ryan Oates owns Tyger River Smart Farm, a hydroponic farm in Duncan, South Carolina. He grows a variety of lettuces, chard, kale, and basil in his 28 x 45-foot greenhouse that he sells to farmers markets, restaurants, and retailers. New to the industry and a first-generation farmer, Oates harvested his first crop in 2013.

Read More

Video – A Discussion on How to Grow More New Farmers at Seedstock’s Annual Conference

January 2, 2014 |

If you didn’t get a chance to attend the 2nd Annual Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture Innovation conference this past winter, don’t fret. We recorded the proceedings and will be rolling out video from this week over the next couple of weeks. The first video below is of the The ‘Growing New Sustainable Farmers’ panel that explores how to effectively create new farmers. The panel was moderated by Paul Greive of Primal Pastures and features panelists John Mesko of the Sustainable Farming Association, Thaddeus Barsotti of Farm Fresh To You, Colin and Karen Archipley of Archi’s Acres and David Rosenstein of EVO Farm.

Read More

Sustainable Ag Org. in Ohio Sees Increased Role in Supporting Influx of New Farmers

December 11, 2013 |
Source: Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association

Source: Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association

Ohio farmers new to sustainable agriculture can get a leg up on the learning curve with the help of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA).

The non-profit organization, established in 1979, works to promote and support the sustainable agriculture community in Ohio from producers to consumers including those new to farming. OEFFA assists new farmers through a variety of networking events, an apprenticeship program, and an investment fund created to encourage the expansion of sustainable farming practices.

Read More

Former Electrical Engineer Strikes Out on His Own, Turns Profit with Sustainable Hydroponic Farming

November 27, 2013 |
Source: Eden Farms

Source: Eden Farms

After ten years as an electrical engineer in Indiana, Randy Butts knew he wanted to be his own boss. Traditional farming tempted him, but he knew that launching a corn or soybean operation from scratch would be a struggle.

Friends of his were growing tomatoes using hydroponic farming, a process that intrigued him. Plants grown hydroponically use a small fraction of the water, land, and nutrients that conventionally-grown agriculture requires, and they produce abundantly in a shorter amount of time than conventionally grown vegetables. They can also be grown year-round. Read More