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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture

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Hydroponics

Former Mushroom Farmer Transforms Unoccupied Greenhouses into Booming Hydroponic Lettuce Business 

May 18, 2016 |
Photo Courtesy of Maple Lane Farms 2

Photo Courtesy of Maple Lane Farms 2

When the mushroom company he was growing for closed down its operation, Allyn Brown, who has been farming for nearly 40 years, wanted to find something similar to mushrooms that would provide him with year-round cash flow.

That’s when Brown decided to grow hydroponic lettuce. But he knew he had to learn how to run a hydroponic operation from an expert to become successful. So, he spent some time at Cornell learning from Lou Albright, a well-known hydroponic guru.

“I did a short course in hydroponics and started to convert my facility over to lettuce,” Brown says. “That got successful and within one year, it doubled in size.” He christened the operation, Maple Lanes Farms 2.

To meet demand, Brown immediately started looking for another greenhouse space. Read More

Hydroponic Farm Preserves Family History, Supports Community with ‘Eat Well, Do Good’ Philosophy

May 12, 2016 |
Image courtesy of Snuck Farm.

Image courtesy of Snuck Farm.

The land used for Snuck Farm has been in Page Westover’s family for more than 100 years; her family helped to settle the idyllic town of Pleasant Grove, Utah, where it is located. Westover says the idea to use the remaining land (much of it has been sold or parceled off over the decades) for sustainable farming came out of a desire to preserve a piece of history while serving their community.

“My dad grew up on this property. We decided that we would revitalize it and preserve a piece of our family history,” says Westover. “We wanted to preserve the pasture, and we wanted to maintain the animals that have been there.”

The farm, which has been in operation for about one year, offers leafy green vegetables grown using hydroponics. Their greenhouse is currently growing different kinds of kale, lettuce, and other salad greens, in addition to chard, basil, and many other herbs.  

Westover says the farm is also in the process of developing an outdoor farmyard where they will grow fruits and other vegetables to round out their selection. Read More

Experts: Hydroponic Growing Offers Advantages, But Won’t Replace Soil

March 15, 2016 |
Tomato plants grow in the soil. (Wikimedia Commons photo)

Tomato plants grow in the soil. (Wikimedia Commons photo)

Traditionally, farmers have grown plants in nutrient-rich soil. Now an increasing number of growers rely on hydroponics, which uses a variety of soil-less media in a controlled environment. 

But which is better—soil or soil-free?

Seedstock ventured to find an answer to this question by talking to a farmer, a hydroponics expert, a horticulturist and a chef. They each have different opinions, but one thing is clear: while soil-less growing techniques can offer incredible benefits,  we still need dirt.

Here’s what they had to say. Read More

Purdue Students Turn to Hydroponics to Supply Indiana Food Bank with Produce Year-Round

March 9, 2016 |
Lettuce grows inside a Purdue Polytechnic greenhouse, where students are working with an area food bank to use hydroponics for a year-round supply of produce and greens. (photo courtesy Lorri Barnett/Purdue Polytechnic)

Lettuce grows inside a Purdue Polytechnic greenhouse, where students are working with an area food bank to use hydroponics for a year-round supply of produce and greens. (Photo courtesy Lorri Barnett/Purdue Polytechnic)

Food banks need fresh produce year-round, but this can prove difficult for those located in harsh winter climes. To address this problem, Purdue Polytechnic students are working on a solution that will provide produce all year long to Second Harvest Food Bank of East Central Indiana.

The solution they came up with is hydroponic growing. Not only would this increase efficiency and productivity of Second Harvest Food Bank’s eight-county operation, but would also enable people who benefit from the food bank to enjoy fresh produce during every month of the year. Read More

Former Pro Golfer Leaves Links to Pursue Promise of Greener Urban Farming Pastures

February 25, 2016 |

mike-lott-urban-food-works-green-wall-urban-farmMike Lott is not your run of the mill farmer. Not long ago, before making the decision to embark on a career in farming and launch his aquaponic and urban agriculture venture, Urban Food Works in Murrieta, CA, Lott was a professional golfer.

He grew up not on a farm, but in a typical southern California home. As a kid, he didn’t awake early in the morning to milk and feed cows, harvest crops, or turn the soil. Instead, he honed his golf game in anticipation of one day playing professionally. After high school Lott headed to the College of the Desert in Palm Desert not only because of its well-known golf program, but also to study Environmental Science. It was there that the seeds of Lott’s interest in and current passion for urban farming and the environment were sown. Read More

Indiana Hydroponic Farm Grows People and Produce

November 17, 2015 |
A group of clients is pictured inside the Growing Opportunities greenhouse. Through working in the hydroponic greenhouse over the course of 20 weeks, the low-income and/or disabled clients gain skills and confidence to enter the work world. (photo courtesy Nicole Wooten/Growing Opportunities)

A group of clients is pictured inside the Growing Opportunities greenhouse. Through working in the hydroponic greenhouse over the course of 20 weeks, the low-income and/or disabled clients gain skills and confidence to enter the work world. (Photo courtesy Nicole Wooten/Growing Opportunities)

Growing Opportunities, an urban farm in Bloomington, Indiana, puts disabled, low-income and unemployed/underemployed adults to work in its hydroponic greenhouse. As a result, it’s producing bumper crops of people with newfound confidence and skills.

A project of Bloomington’s South Central Community Action Program, Growing Opportunities works with clients who need help by teaching them both hard and soft vocational skills via the pathway of growing food. Its greenhouse is located at Stone Belt, an organization with 50 years of experience providing resources for those with disabilities. Read More

From Orchids to Organic Hydroponic Produce – A Q&A with Sundial Farms’ Tarek Hijazi

October 4, 2015 |
HIjazi at work with his dog. Courtesy of Sundial Farms

Hijazi at work with his dog. Courtesy of Sundial Farms

California water regulations prompted San Diego-based Sundial Farms to switch from growing orchids to producing organic hydroponic produce in 2012. The farm is also pioneering the use of liquid organics fertilizers. Seedstock last wrote about them here in December 2013.

Seedstock caught up with Tarek Hijazi, manager of finance and hydroponic systems for Sundial Farms, to get his take on the challenge of growing produce amid California’s drought.  Hijazi will be a panel speaker at the 4th Annual Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture Conference on November 3-4 in San Diego. HIs panel will discuss indoor growing and the pursuit of market demand. Read More

Seedstock Names Go Green Agriculture Founder and CEO as 2015 Sustainable Agriculture Conference Keynote

July 6, 2015 |

Pierre SleimanSAN DIEGO, CA (PRWEB) – July 06, 2015 – Seedstock today announced Pierre Sleiman, founder and CEO of Go Green Agriculture, will deliver the keynote address at the 4th Annual Seedstock Sustainable Agriculture Conference – “Innovation and the Small Farmer” – to be held Nov. 3-4 San Diego.

This year’s conference, held at the University of California-San Diego, will explore solutions and methodologies that small farmers and entrepreneurs are developing to improve access to fresh and healthy food and generate new jobs against the dueling backdrop of a lingering drought and burgeoning local food marketplace.

The first day of the event offers a field trip where a limited number of participants will have the opportunity to tour a diversity of small farms in the San Diego-area from indoor hydroponic operations to sustainable field farms and urban agriculture endeavors. Sleiman’s hydroponic operations, as featured in a Seedstock article, are considered a model for the country to bring local food production closer to urban centers. Read More