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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture

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Food Security

Urban Ag Greening Offers Gateway to Stronger, Safer St. Louis

June 16, 2016 |
Gateway Greening St. Louis Urban Agriculture Organization

Gateway Greening’s mission is to educate and empower individuals to strengthen their communities through gardening and urban agriculture. Photo credit: Gateway Greening with permission from Jenna Davis.

Gateway Greening has been taking a holistic approach to urban agriculture, gardening, and education in St. Louis for more than three decades.

“Our mission is to educate and empower individuals to strengthen their communities through gardening and urban agriculture,” Gateway Greening’s Communications Manager Jenna Davis says.

While the group started out as a gardening club focused on ornamental, native, and perennial plants, Davis says it has since blossomed into a three-pronged catalyst for grassroots community building. Read More

USDA Announces $16.8 Million in Grants to Help SNAP Participants Purchase More Fruits and Vegetables

June 8, 2016 |

post_usdalogoNews Release – WASHINGTON, June 8, 2016 — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today awarded $16.8 million in competitive grants to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants increase their purchases of fruits and vegetables. The funding comes from the Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive (FINI) program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill and administered by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

“USDA is committed to providing low income families with the resources they need to consume more nutritious food. Last year, SNAP kept at least 4.7 million Americans — including 2.1 million children — out of poverty,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “Programs like FINI build on the success we’ve seen with the use of healthy incentives and with many of the projects being run at farmers markets, we’re also helping to strengthen local and regional food systems.” Read More

Despite Current Dysfunction in the Food System, Renowned Agroecology Expert Holds Out Hope for Future

May 10, 2016 |
Stephen Gliessman, professor emeritus of agroecology at the university, shares his thoughts regarding the state of the food system. Courtesy University of California, Santa Cruz

Stephen R. Gliessman, Alfred E. Heller Professor of Agroecology in UC Santa Cruz’s Environmental Studies Department, shares his thoughts regarding the state of the food system. Photo courtesy University of California, Santa Cruz

What is the state of the nation’s food system? Is it fundamentally broken and beyond repair? Does it need to be changed, and if so, how? What is it doing right?

To address these questions, we reached out to Stephen R. Gliessman, an internationally recognized leader in the field of agroecology, and the Alfred E. Heller Professor of Agroecology in UC Santa Cruz’s Environmental Studies Department, where he has taught since 1981. He was the founding director of the UCSC Agroecology Program (now the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems) and is the author of the renowned and pioneering textbook Agroecology: The Ecology of Sustainable Food Systems. In 2008, Gliessman became the chief editor of the internationally known Journal of Sustainable Agriculture.

Here is what we learned:

What is the state of the food system?

The current state of the food system is unhealthy. There is too much emphasis put on the business of growing food rather than long-term stewardship, care for the earth, and the people who grow food. That, I think, is a more important part of what’s going on. It’s amazing what the current food system is able to produce in terms of calories, but it’s also amazing in terms of what it doesn’t produce in terms of healthy nutritious food. Read More

Why Fixing Food Deserts is About More Than Building Grocery Stores

March 8, 2016 |
Corner store at The Growhaus in Denver’s Elyria-Swansea neighborhood. Image courtesy of The Growhaus

Corner store at The Growhaus in Denver’s Elyria-Swansea neighborhood.
Image courtesy of The Growhaus

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has defined food deserts as parts of the country where it ‘s hard to buy fresh fruit, vegetables, and other whole foods. To be considered a food desert, at least 500 people or 33 percent of an area’s population must live further than one mile from a supermarket or large grocery store. That distance increases to 10 miles when defining a rural food desert. Food deserts are often located in impoverished and in areas with higher concentrations of minorities; though this is not always true.

That’s the textbook definition—but to fully understand where food deserts come from, it’s imperative to examine some of America’s not-so-shining moments. Among them: redlining, a practice used throughout the 20th century (that still occurs today) to limit or deny financial services to residents of minority and poor white neighborhoods; and “white flight,” the term used to describe the departure of whites from urban areas with increasing numbers of minorities. Read More

Seattle Tilth Plans Expansion of Rainier Beach Urban Farm

January 20, 2016 |
Seattle Youth Garden Works participants and staff. Image courtesy of Seattle Tilth.

Seattle Youth Garden Works participants and staff. Image courtesy of Seattle Tilth.

After several years of fundraising and planning, including a $3 million capital campaign, construction on Rainier Beach Urban Farm and Wetlands is tentatively set to start in April 2016. Seattle Tilth, the “nonprofit organic gardening and urban ecology organization” that operates the farm, spearheaded the expansion, with help from the Seattle Parks Foundation.

The Rainier Beach Urban Farm, previously featured in Seedstock, is “Seattle’s largest urban farm.” It grows fruit and vegetables that are sold at farms stands or cooked up for free community meals. Educational programming teaches volunteers and visitors about how to grow and cook fresh, healthy food. Other programs focus on the restoration of the wetlands. Read More

Grassroots Efforts Target Food Insecurity in San Bernardino County, CA

August 11, 2015 |
A feast is enjoyed at Huerta Del Valle Community Garden in San Bernardino County. (photo courtesy of Arthur Levine/Huerta Del Valle)

A feast is enjoyed at Huerta Del Valle Community Garden in San Bernardino County. (photo courtesy of Arthur Levine/Huerta Del Valle)

San Bernardino County, the largest county in the United States, stretches all the way from Southern California’s Inland Empire to the California-Nevada state line. 

In addition to numerous farms and other agricultural businesses, the county is home to Amy’s Farm, a polyculture-oriented farm in Ontario with a focus on education; Huerta del Valle, a robust community garden in Ontario; and the Upland-based Incredible Edible Community Garden.

Thanks to people like Arthur Levine, local and urban agriculture in San Bernardino County is experiencing a burgeoning grassroots movement. Read More

Food Assistance Program Brings More Fruit and Vegetables to Needy, Helps Local Farmers

May 3, 2015 |
The Zilke Vegetable Farm in Milan, Michigan is one of many Michigan farms that has benefited from the Double Up Food Bucks program. (photo courtesy of Emilie Engelhard/Fair Food Network)

The Zilke Vegetable Farm in Milan, Michigan is one of many Michigan farms that has benefited from the Double Up Food Bucks program. (photo courtesy of Emilie Engelhard/Fair Food Network)

Actress Gwyneth Paltrow recently remarked how difficult her experience was of trying to rely on only food stamps for a week’s worth of food. Perhaps it would have been easier had she been able to take advantage of the Double Up Food Bucks program.

That’s because Double Up Food Bucks, run by the Fair Food Network (headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan), doubles the value of federal nutrition aid used at stores and markets that participate. Through this program, not only do low-income consumers have much greater access to fresh fruits and vegetables, but local farmers make more money and the economy benefits from more money spent on locally-produced foods. Read More

5 Native Tribal Organizations Reviving Sustainable Agriculture Tradition

January 15, 2015 |
Photo courtesy of Team Toca

Photo courtesy of Team Toca

Sustainable agriculture techniques like companion planting and dryland farming were practiced for thousands of years in North America by Native Americans. Today, health problems and loss of ancestral knowledge about food and farming are common in many tribal communities. Sustainable farming is a way for tribes to get back to their roots while addressing these problems.

Here are five organizations looking to their heritage for solutions to address these and other problems. Read More