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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
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community supported agriculture

Back to the Land: Mott Family Farm, Middlebourne, Ohio.

October 17, 2013 |
Swiss Chard from Mott Family. Photo Credit: Mott Family Farm.

Swiss Chard from Mott Family. Photo Credit: Mott Family Farm.

An Ohio native who moved to the bright sunny state of Southern California, Jeff Mott decided his life had a different purpose. That purpose meant leaving behind the SoCal lifestyle, buying an Amish homestead on the Virginia/Ohio border and initiating a lifestyle change that has not only proven to be profitable, but has also changed his entire perspective.

35 miles outside of Wheeling, West Virginia lies the Mott Family Farm, the Ohio-based haven of two former California residents, Jeff and Shelley Mott, who craved a back to basics approach to life, a slowing down of pace and an opportunity to share a love of growing that began in California. Land prices and moving closer to Jeff’s father were only part of the equation. Mott felt his California lifestyle was missing a sense of community. Read More

Growing Up and Out in Salt Lake County: Bell Organic, Draper, Utah

August 26, 2013 |
Photo credit: Bell Organic

Photo credit: Bell Organic

“Climbing was great training for farming. They are both really exhausting, painful, frightening experiences that look impossible on the face of them but somehow you get it done.” David Bell, Bell Organic Farm

Located 12 miles north of Salt Lake City, Bell Organic farm of Draper, Utah is what happens when you outgrow your garden and tap an ever expanding marketplace for fresh organic produce. For David and Jill Bell it all started with a bumper crop of heirloom tomatoes.

In 1997, David Bell ran a successful rock climbing business and his wife Jill spent her days waitressing in a local restaurant. They began growing their own vegetables in the backyard, producing far more tomatoes than needed. A local restaurant owner put them in touch with his chef who immediately purchased their excess veggies. Soon after, a local market owner who imported his tomatoes from a greenhouse in Holland wanted to make a purchase. Read More

Chicago Couple Opts for Peasant Life; Moves to Country to Fulfill Dream of Organic Farming

August 21, 2013 |
Julia and Todd McDonald of Peasants' Plot. Photo Credit: Peasant's Plot

Julia and Todd McDonald of Peasants’ Plot. Photo Credit: Peasant’s Plot

Among city-dwellers, there are those that dream of a different life. This dream often brings them out of the city, back to the land, and, in some cases, leads them to a life of organic farming. When Todd and Julia McDonald met they shared such a dream. Living in Chicago, Todd and Julia often entertained the idea of becoming organic farmers.

“I distinctly remember one of our first conversations in which we both disclosed our ideas for our futures, what we wanted to be ‘when we grew up.’  [Todd] said ‘I don’t have any great ambition. I just want to be an organic farmer,’” said Julia McDonald. Read More

Farm Kid Turned Anthropologist Returns to a Life in Sustainable Agriculture

July 29, 2013 |
Photo Credit: Missy Smith.

Photo Credit: Everblossom Farm.

As a fourth generation farmer, Elaine Lemmon has a fond relationship with dirt. But growing up, she didn’t plan on becoming a farmer later in her life. When the real world called, she answered, studying anthropology and archeology at Penn State University. But, her studies would later steer her back to farming. “I soon got disenchanted with how science-for-profit really wasn’t good science,” says Lemmon. “The part of archeology I really loved was working outside and working in the soil.”

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High Schoolers at Pasadena’s Muir Ranch Connect to Food, Support 150 Member CSA

July 11, 2013 |

John Muir Ranch in Pasadena, Calif., has only been in full operation since 2011, but during the past two years, the once small, test garden has grown into a large, vegetable and flower producing farm.

The Ranch resides at the John Muir High School campus. When Doss Jones, former biology teacher, master gardener and founder of Muir Ranch, planted the Ranch’s first plot, she only used it as a learning garden for one of the high school’s elective courses. “It was six rows. [At the time,] she was working with another master gardener and they had a little bit of grant money to try and build a curriculum, but the money, after two years, it was gone. They couldn’t really do much more with the garden [at the time],” Erika Redke, former CSA manager at Muir Ranch, said. Read More