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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
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Posts By Susan Botich

South Carolina Affordable Housing Lender Expands Mission to Address Healthy Food Access

January 20, 2014 |
 CLF Executive Director Michelle Mapp showing South Carolina "food deserts" at the 2012 Growing Food and Opportunities in South Carolina conference Photo courtesy of: South Carolina Community Loan Fund

CLF Executive Director Michelle Mapp showing South Carolina “food deserts” at the 2012 Growing Food and Opportunities in South Carolina conference
Photo courtesy of: South Carolina Community Loan Fund

Why would an established affordable housing lending institution decide to change its name?

“Lowcountry Housing Trust has been the South Carolina leader in affordable housing lending,” says Anna Hamilton, strategic initiatives director for the organization. “As we worked under our previous name of Lowcountry Housing Trust, we thought that we’d really love to see a grocery store here or a daycare there. To realize our vision of a sustainable community, we added community business loans and healthy foods retail loans. We believe our new name, South Carolina Community Loan Fund says what we really do because our mission had evolved to more than just affordable housing.”

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Food Hub Creates Transparent Local Value Chain in Northern Michigan’s Cherry Country

January 17, 2014 |

 

Some of the many products Cherry Capital Foods distributes  Photo courtesy of Cherry Capital Foods

Some of the many products Cherry Capital Foods distributes
Photo courtesy of Cherry Capital Foods

Cherry Capital Foods opened business in 2007 with a single man selling local produce out of his van. The following year, John Hoagland bought the business and took it to the next level.

“As a distributor, Cherry Capital Foods picks up and delivers to schools, restaurants and other institutions,” says Evan Smith, chief of operations and spokesperson for Cherry Capital Foods. “We’re part of the value chain that connects local to local. A value chain is like a supply chain but it’s more transparent and collaborative so that everyone along the chain is valued. In a value chain, everyone earns a living and it is benefiting everyone along the way.” Read More

California CSA creates a new business model for the ‘Regular Old Joe’

January 10, 2014 |
Harvest 2U owner Don Webber has a lot to smile about.   Photo courtesy of Don Webber

Harvest 2U owner Don Webber has a lot to smile about.
Photo courtesy of Don Webber

When Don Webber got a phone call from an organic farmer-friend asking for help selling produce, his mental gears started to turn.

“I have a background in sales and marketing,” says Webber. “I was very intrigued from the financial aspect and the social aspect. After researching local Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) business models, I decided we’d do things a little differently: reach out to a market segment that had not been involved in CSA—the regular old Joe.” Read More

New York Distributor Brings the Farmers’ Market to the Supermarket; Increases Local Food Access

January 3, 2014 |
Dan Horan, President & CEO of Five Acre Farms Image Credit: Five Acre Farms

Dan Horan, President & CEO of Five Acre Farms
Image Credit: Five Acre Farms

Dan Horan had a notion back in 1989 that started with a college essay and turned into a business plan: enlist the cooperative efforts of various small farms in the region to supply supermarkets with locally produced foods. The idea of bringing the farmers’ market to the local supermarket was planted, he says.

“Fast-forward to 2010,” says Horan. “I sold the company I was involved with and hired my first employee.”

The name for Horan’s new venture, Five Acre Farms, came from the principle of small, local agriculture serving its local communities, according to Horan.

“Our focus was on the mainstream customer,” says Horan, “improving their access to local food where most of the shopping is happening—in the supermarkets. Less than 10 percent of people can support the farmers’ market. We wanted to be in the mainstream shopping centers.” Read More

Northern Michigan Couple Builds Profitable Farm-to-school Enterprise

December 27, 2013 |

post9beansrowNic and Jen Welty wanted to see more locally grown, nutritious foods offered to the students at their daughter’s school in Leelanau County, Michigan. Having previously worked as Farm Manager at Black Star Farms in nearby Suttons Bay, Nic Welty was poised to start his own venture. So, in 2008, the couple started their own company, 9 Bean Rows, and built a Community Supported Agriculture program with a focus on supplying local food to area schools. Soon, the couple snared a contract to supply the Leelanau County Public School System year-round with fresh salad greens. Read More