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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
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Posts By Nicola Kerslake

Las Vegas Nonprofit Offers Data-Driven Support for Sustainable Ag

February 12, 2014 |

postGC_Logo_Final_Square_RGB“We don’t farm, we don’t run CSAs, and we don’t manage community gardens,” says Green Chips executive director Rick VanDiepen. “But we offer data that supports and encourages all of these activities.”

The four-year-old organization grew from informal brainstorming sessions between Las Vegas casino sustainability executives. The group eventually sought out specific projects to devote their collective energy to, and Green Chips was born. The organization views itself as a public-private partnership with funding from public and private entities, such as the City of Las Vegas, local casinos and utilities. Its board includes representatives from public television, the visitor’s authority and local nonprofits. Read More

Las Vegas Volunteers Seize Opportunity to Reduce Yard Waste and Feed the Hungry

February 11, 2014 |
Project AngelFaces Volunteers harvest pomegranate from a backyard tree.  Photo courtesy of Project AmgelFaces.

Project AngelFaces Volunteers harvest pomegranate from a backyard tree. Photo courtesy of Project AmgelFaces.

Rhonda Killough’s path to sustainable agriculture was an unusual one.  While pursuing a career in performing arts in Las Vegas, her life was abruptly stalled by a motorbike accident in 2002.

“I was physically broken, I couldn’t move very much so I mostly listened to NPR,” she recalls.  Two news reports in particular caught her ear. One described Las Vegas as the most wasteful city in the country, and the second outlined the impact of a lack of fresh produce on the incidence of diabetes in underprivileged communities.

As part of her recovery, Killough started taking brief walks around her neighborhood and got chatting with the groundskeeper at a neighbor’s large home.  Read More

Startup Co. Targets Small Indoor Farmers; Aims to Make Hydroponic Control Systems More Accessible

October 24, 2013 |
Sustainable Microfarms aims to make hydroponic systems cheaper and more cost-effective.

Sustainable Microfarms aims to make hydroponic control systems cheaper and more cost-effective.

Sanjay Rajpoot, founder of hydroponic nutrient control system firm Sustainable Microfarms, was an early starter when it came to sustainable agriculture. Fascinated by Singaporean rooftop gardens at an age when most of his peers were more interested in X-Boxes, Rajpoot began researching his business at the age of 16, and was spending time with greenhouse automation expert Dr. Heiner Lieth at his UC Davis lab by the age of 19.

“One of my mentors growing up is an embedded systems researcher, so I was fascinated by the idea of creating better, cheaper controls for hydroponic systems,” says Rajpoot.

Read More

AgFunder Brings Equity Crowdfunding to Sustainable Agriculture

October 21, 2013 |
AgFunder opens ag investment to the crowd with beta launch of a new equity crowdfunding platform.

AgFunder opens ag investment to the crowd with beta launch of a new equity crowdfunding platform.

Sustainable agriculture entrepreneurs have a new fundraising option. AgFunder, an equity crowdfunding platform launched its beta site on Sept. 23, the same day that the Securities and Exchange Commission lifted an 80-year old ban on general advertising and soliciting for private investments.

AgFunder combines the business, scientific and agronomist acumen of its three founders to create a true crowdinvesting platform for agriculture startups. For each project listed on the site, AgFunder creates a fund, which in turn holds a stake in the project. This differs from the crowdfunding model of sites such as Kickstarter and IndieGoGo, as investors actually own a piece of the project instead of just preordering a product or making a donation to a worthy effort. AgFunder makes money by charging a listing fee to each project, and by taking a cut of the profits paid to investors. Read More

Coders, Ranchers, Chefs Converge at Stanford U. to Hack Meat Supply Chain

June 26, 2013 |
meathack1

Photo Credit: Nicola Kerslake

Nowadays, there seems to be at least one hackathon per hacker. Even in the notoriously tech-adverse sustainable agriculture world, we’ve seen events ranging from the software-focused Hacking for Good (Food) to the policy-oriented Farm Bill Hack to the National Young Farmer’s Coalition’s Farm Hack, which adapts commonplace farm equipment to innovative uses. Yet, there are still plenty of food chain issues that could use innovative approaches.

This past weekend, Stanford University hosted the Hack//Meat SF, the second of a series of meat supply chain hackathons organized by New York-based Food+Tech Connect. The event brought together in excess of 150 coders, ranchers, chefs, and designers to create better solutions for the meat supply chain over a rainy weekend, a particularly tough challenge in light of the complexity of the issues involved. Read More