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Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
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Posts By AJ Hughes

San Luis Obispo Nonprofit Supports Young Farmers and Urban Farming on the California Coast

February 25, 2014 |

postCCGCalifornia’s San Luis Obispo County has a plethora of microclimates that enable farmers to produce a great variety of crops. Promoting a local food culture that takes advantage of that diversity and abundance is the mission of Central Coast Grown, a San Luis Obispo-based non-profit organization that strives to build awareness, production and consumption of locally grown food by conserving farmland and supporting young farmers and urban farming.

According to the organization’s executive director Jenna Smith, Central Coast Grown works to conserve land currently in agricultural production, as well as to educate the public about food and its origins.

“We want the sustainable agriculture movement to grow in San Luis Obispo County,” Smith says. “Agriculture is the top industry in the county. We want to promote local food literacy among the community.” Read More

City of Cleveland Embraces Urban Agriculture through Zoning, Grants and Partnerships

February 17, 2014 |
The Green City Growers Cooperative operates a 3.25-acre greenhouse in the heart of Cleveland, Ohio. The greenhouse grows basil and several types of lettuce. (Photo provided by Daniel Ball of the Cleveland mayor's office).

The Green City Growers Cooperative operates a 3.25-acre greenhouse in the heart of Cleveland, Ohio. The greenhouse grows basil and several types of lettuce. (Photo provided by Daniel Ball of the Cleveland mayor’s office).

Although Cleveland, Ohio is known as a rust belt city, it’s also located in the prime agricultural lands of eastern Ohio.

Now, through policy initiatives and partnerships, Cleveland is tapping into its geographical bounty.

During the Great Recession, foreclosures impacted already struggling neighborhoods in the city, and food deserts increased after grocery stores left these areas.

But on the flip side, more land became available for green space.

An Urban Agriculture and Green Space Zoning Ordinance had been adopted by the city in 2005, but at first, the city was primarily focused on parks and recreation facilities. The agriculture aspect of the ordinance began to gain traction in 2007 as the city began to allow farming uses through zoning. In 2009, zoning rules were further modified to allow most city residents to keep chickens, ducks and rabbits, as well as beehives. Now, people in the city may also raise goats, pigs and sheep. Read More

2014 Will Be the Year of Aquaponics, Predicts Designer of Affordable DIY Systems

February 4, 2014 |
Herbs, basil and Swiss chard are grown in a FarmTower Co. do-it-yourself farm tower. (photo by Arish Amini)

Herbs, basil and Swiss chard are grown in a FarmTower Co. do-it-yourself farm tower. (photo by Arash Amini)

Chicagoan Arash Amini believes in environmental and agricultural sustainability, civic responsibility and economic development. Through aquaponics, he has brought all three of these components together.

In college at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where Amini earned a physics degree in 2010, he became enthralled with environmental science and environmental engineering. After graduating, he and some friends started a next-generation agriculture company, 312 Aquaponics. But his vision kept evolving, and in 2013 he founded FarmTower Co. in order to deliver affordable aquaponics systems to the public.

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