Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
Fostering Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture
Scroll to top

Top

Posts By AJ Hughes

Garden Education Org Uses Aquaponics to Grow Future Leaders

August 3, 2016 |
Prentice Shew, a Global Gardens volunteer, assists a student at Union Middle School in Tulsa, Oklahoma with the school’s new aquaponics system. (photo courtesy Prentice Shew/Global Gardens)

Prentice Shew, a Global Gardens volunteer, assists a student at Union Middle School in Tulsa, Oklahoma with the school’s new aquaponics system. (photo courtesy Prentice Shew/Global Gardens)

A middle school in Tulsa, Oklahoma is now home to an aquaponics system. The endeavor comes courtesy of nonprofit Global Gardens, which sees garden education as a way to not only help students in low-income communities become more knowledgeable about science, health and the environment, but also to become more confident and forward-thinking leaders.

Aquaponics is only one facet of Global Gardens’ focus. Its middle school site and three elementary school project locations not only teach broad-based gardening skills to kids, but also depend on wide community participation. As such, all four projects are education-centered. Each brings together members of the community and offers participating students much more than gardening education.

“The community’s really running this thing,” Hajjar says. “We have one volunteer at each after-school program, and we’re always on the hunt for volunteers. The focus is on the people—food really brings people together. A garden is a great equalizer—it’s magic when it comes to community.”

Read More

In the Face of Discrimination, LGBTQ Farmers Have Hope for the Future

August 1, 2016 |

“I grew up on the family farm, but there’s no place for me on the farm—the future’s not there,” says Ryan Reed, who was raised in Illinois and is now involved with the International Gay Rodeo Association.

“A nonprofit did not renew my contract after two years because of who I am,” says lesbian urban farmer Ari Rosenberg of Philadelphia.

“Farming in general is rural, and in a rural environment, LGBT does not fly,” says Nathan Looney, a transgender urban farmer in Los Angeles.

Their voices are among many LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) farmers who strive to be true to themselves—not only in terms of vocation, but also regarding their core selves as expressed through sexual orientation and gender identity. This can be difficult, but a number of organizations are engaged in some serious advocacy work to help LGBTQ farmers live up to and into their truest selves. Read More

Community College in Southwest Embraces Aquaponics to Grow Farmers of the Future

July 26, 2016 |
Urban Agriculture Students at Santa Fe Community College learn about hydroponics and aquaponics. A new aquaponics facility is on the horizon for the college.(photo courtesy Adam Cohen/Santa Fe Community College)

Urban Agriculture Students at Santa Fe Community College learn about hydroponics and aquaponics. A new aquaponics facility is on the horizon for the college.(photo courtesy Adam Cohen/Santa Fe Community College)

With the embrace of aquaponics growing in tow with the urban agriculture sector, Santa Fe Community College in New Mexico wants to stay ahead of the curve and insure that its students are positioned to become the farmers of the future.

“The aquaponics industry is growing—10 years ago no one had heard of aquaponics and hydroponics—now people are excited,” says Adam Cohen, lead faculty member for the college’s greenhouse management program. “In the next five years, where do we go? We want to get information out to people and provide students with a way to go out and find jobs.”

Cohen says that aquaponics is a great agricultural technology to employ and teach in New Mexico as the state has a very arid climate and trenchant water resource challenges. Read More

Hydroponics Ideal Teaching Tool for STEM Learning, says Georgia Middle School

July 11, 2016 |
Pine Grove Middle School in Georgia has a robust agriculture program—now, hydroponics will be part of the mix. (photo courtesy Zach Hurley/Pine Grove Middle School)

Pine Grove Middle School in Georgia has a robust agriculture program—now, hydroponics will be part of the mix. (photo courtesy Zach Hurley/Pine Grove Middle School)

Indoor growing and hydroponic agriculture is not just for adults. So says Pine Grove Middle School in Valdosta, Georgia, which began construction on a new hydroponics learning laboratory for its students this past march.

One of the primary reasons for the new facility is the school’s desire to become STEM-certified.

STEM-certified schools are recognized by the Georgia Department of Education as offering top-level education in science, technology, engineering and math. Because hands-on learning is seen as vital for this type of education, Pine Grove Middle School decided that hydroponics is an ideal teaching tool.

The school is funding the hydroponics learning laboratory with a $700,000 ‘Boosting Learning Through Authentic STEM Learning’ grant that was awarded by the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement Georgia Innovation Fund. Read More

SoCal University’s Aeroponic Garden Challenges Food System Status Quo

June 28, 2016 |

A prominent university in Southern California is utilizing aeroponics to challenge the food systems status quo on campus. The University of Southern California (USC) Teaching Garden was established this spring to supply fresh produce to the university’s on-campus restaurants, dining halls, catering … Read More